Fairy Folk and Family History

A couple of local gents are drinking a pint in a pub near Cushendall, County Antrim, one evening when a redhead comes through the door. “Ah, there’s that Liz Weir who believes in fairies,” one says. Weir, an Irish storyteller with an international reputation, stops. “And you don’t?” He smiles and shakes his head. “So now, tell me, will you be cutting down that fairy tree on your place any time soon?” She means an old Hawthorne...

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Story Quote #10 (Joseph Campbell, Give Me A Break!!)

“All of the great mythologies and much of the mythic story-telling of the world are from the male point of view. When I was writing The Hero with a Thousand Faces and wanted to bring female heroes in, I had to go to the fairy tales. These were told by women to children, you know, and you get a different perspective. It was the men who got involved in spinning most of the great myths. The women were too busy; they had too damn much to...

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Story Quote #9

“The story itself becomes the weapon of the weaponless. The struggles of women, for example, are not resolved by combat, on the whole (one or two Amazon heroines excepted) . . . when they need to undo error or redeem wrongdoing or defend the innocent, they raise their voices, if only in a conspiratorial whisper–hence the suspicion of women’s talk that haunts the whole history of the old wives’ tale.” –Marina...

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