Fairy Folk and Family History

A couple of local gents are drinking a pint in a pub near Cushendall, County Antrim, one evening when a redhead comes through the door. “Ah, there’s that Liz Weir who believes in fairies,” one says. Weir, an Irish storyteller with an international reputation, stops. “And you don’t?” He smiles and shakes his head. “So now, tell me, will you be cutting down that fairy tree on your place any time soon?” She means an old Hawthorne...

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Stella Goes Out for Coffee

Larger than life is a term applied to heroes. They leave an impression. Stella, our three-legged Great Dane, does that. She can go out for coffee and come home immortalized as a cartoon by Boulder’s Shoney Sien. Stella’s big, but gentle. She has a brown eye and a blue eye–not common in Great Danes. She likes to be petted but still manages to give the impression that she’s aloof, not needy. Treats?–her highness needs...

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Storyteller Dolls and Their Little Listeners

Helen Cordero is famous for creating clay storyteller dolls. Born in 1915, she grew up in the Cochiti Pueblo of New Mexico, an adobe village in the southwestern United States situated between the Rio Grande River and the Jemez Mountains. For more than a thousand years, people in her pueblo have made distinctive pottery featuring black designs painted over layers and layers of white clay slip.  Traditionally the potters of Cochiti made useful...

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Little Folk–Hobgoblin

If you meet a hobgoblin and he asks for a coin, find one. Dig deep if you have to. Otherwise, he’ll turn the forest around and you’ll lose your way. When I read that old eastern European tradition, I thought, THAT explains it. Aren’t we all lost in one sense or another? Maybe, we aren’t paying the hobgoblin. Too many of us underestimate the Little Folk. Or think we outgrow them. Generations past didn’t make that...

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Aesop’s Fiddling Grasshopper–Yeah!!

How we tell our stories makes all the difference. For example, my grandma Melba had an original spin on Aesop’s famous fable of the ants and the grasshopper. According to Aesop, (620-560 B.C. Greek slave and famed storyteller) the ants were busy, as ants usually are, putting food away for the coming cold. The grasshopper preferred to sun himself and fiddle. Of course, when the seasons changed, the grasshopper found himself hungry and without...

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