Pueblo Storytelling Traditions and Mine

Pueblo Storytelling Traditions and Mine

Just read Leslie Marmon Silko’s book Storyteller for the second time. It is a delightful collection of short stories, photographs, and poetry influenced by the traditional stories of Silko’s Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. It’s worth two reads because it illustrates how storytelling shapes people, families and whole cultures. The shaping is subtle and sometimes odd. Silko includes a couple of stories that stick in her memory...

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Note to Fairy Godmother: Seven Things Better Than a Fancy Dress

Note to Fairy Godmother: Seven Things Better Than a Fancy Dress

My granddaughter wants to go to space camp. Not cheap, but I think we’ll make it happen. Made me think about Cinderella and that ball gown–those glass slippers. What else might have changed Cinderella’s life? books—they open the whole world airfare–travel broadens and leaves the traveler more likely to embrace different people and different ways lessons–music or dance or art or photography or sewing or...

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We Tell Stories Because We’re Proud!!!

We Tell Stories Because We’re Proud!!!

Went to my son’s latest movie–PLANES. Yes, I say that like he did the whole thing. Actually, I say that like a mother. Ethan Hurd is an animator who has worked on a number of movies–Toy Story 2, Shek, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Madagascar, Bolt, etc. etc. On PLANES  he was an assistant supervisor. That means his name came up in the credits larger than before. Mothers notice things like that. So do dads. Jon elbowed...

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Have A Hoop Snake Day–Great American Story

Have A Hoop Snake Day–Great American Story

When God created the snake without legs, the hoop snake was having none of it. Taking tail in mouth, he rolled away. A story told in two sentences is worth noting. Actually there are many stories of hoop snakes. It’s a legendary creature in American folklore often associated with Pecos Bill stories, but it’s origins might be older. A similar snake in Greek mythology, the ouroboros, was a symbol of eternal return. In Japanese...

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The Grimm Brothers Murder Women’s Spinning Tales

The Grimm Brothers Murder Women’s Spinning Tales

Maybe the Grimm brothers didn’t set out to kill women’s stories, but they did. Here’s what happened: Rumpenstünzchen was a spinning tale, part of a large number of spinning tales that European women shared while spinning and weaving flax into cloth, an arduous task that was usually done in the evening after all the other tasks were completed (children cared for, meals fixed, animals fed, eggs sold, laundry washed—you get the...

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